The Official Review Thread of 2018

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby anonymous1980 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 6:40 am

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATION
Cast: Adam Sandler, Selena Gomez, Andy Samberg, Kathryn Hahn, Jim Gaffigan, Mel Brooks, Steve Buscemi, Kevin James, David Spade, Keegan Michael Key, Molly Shannon, Fran Drescher, Asher Blinkoff, Chris Parnell, Joe Jonas, Chrissie Teigen (voices).
Dir: Genndy Tartakovsky.

I have to admit, I am warming up to the Hotel Transylvania franchise and I also have to admit that as far as Adam Sandler franchises go, this is a better way to go than the Grown Ups movies. This time, Mavis brings her father Dracula to a cruise and he falls in love with the cruise's captain, who turns out to be the great-granddaughter of his nemesis, Van Helsing. There's nothing offensive about this movie. But there's nothing great about this movie either. The plot goes where you think it's gonna go. There are some clever jokes and gags and some really cool animation. But nothing more than that. All in all, it's entertaining enough for kids and not a complete groaner for adults. So...yay, I guess?

Oscar Prospects: None.

Grade: B-

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby anonymous1980 » Sat Aug 25, 2018 8:30 am

CRAZY RICH ASIANS
Cast: Constance Wu, Henry Golding, Michelle Yeoh, Gemma Chan, Lisa Lu, Akwafina, Ken Jeong, Harry Shum Jr., Chris Pang, Sonoya Mizuno, Nico Santos, Jimmy O. Yang, Ronnie Chieng.
Dir: Jon M. Chu

I get that this is a big deal since this is only like the second mainstream Hollywood-made film featuring an entirely Asian-American cast. But is it good? Thankfully, it IS. Chinese-American woman and her Singaporean boyfriend go to the latter's home country for a wedding then finds out he's from a super-duper rich family. In many ways, much like Love, Simon, this is a formulaic, unremarkable film plot-wise but we are seeing these familiar tropes and beats through the context of another culture. I've seen lots of Asian movies so this is nothing new but it does have that Hollywood slick and you really sucked into things. The cast is quite good. Michelle Yeoh, in particular, is a standout. Here's to more Asians in mainstream Hollywood movie, I guess.

Oscar Prospects: Probably NOT Best Picture. MAYBE Adapted Screenplay if the competition is sparse. Michelle Yeoh, I think, has a shot if they play their cards right. It does deserve Costume Design and Production Design nominations.

Grade: B+

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby dws1982 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 9:08 am

Paul, Apostle of Christ
Legit not-bad, not even--in my opinion--on the "for this kind of movie" sliding scale that I usually allow. (It's "very good" if I grade on that standard.) Will obviously resonate more with a Christian than with others, but it takes an interesting and more complicated view of these people and their lives than you might expect. It's easy to have faith and believe when things are going well, but when you're really faced with struggle--the most extreme case being death, as some of these characters face--it's different to try to hold to those things. Faith, and your relationship to it, plays out differently. It carries a heavier weight. Pretty well-shot, in my opinion, and does a good job evoking what these people faced without resorting to anything like Passion of the Christ-level violence. The acting is more hit-and-miss: Most of the roles are not substantial, but Jim Caviezel's Luke isn't much and could've been something, Olivier Martinez is okay, I guess, but has a distracting accent; On the other hand, John Lynch and Joanne Walley are both pretty solid in roles that could've faded into the background. James Faulkner is actually quite excellent in the title role; looking at his filmography, I've seen him in things before, but--probably owing to the giant beard he sports here--he never registered as anyone I recognized. Very good performance, and it certainly goes a long way towards making the ending--which is pretty much a home run--as moving as it is.

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby dws1982 » Sun Aug 12, 2018 9:00 pm

I saw a lady take her shoes off and prop her bare feet up on the seat in front of her yesterday. And this wasn't a teenager (who, let's face it, is going to be socialized differently when it comes to norms and proper behavior in a movie theater), this woman was at least 40. I'm not one to tell people to be quiet or put their phone away, and even if I were, it was probably wasn't my place in this case. But I did spare a few nasty stares for her, including out the lobby.

Which brings me to...

Christopher Robin
It's kind of a riff on the same storyline as Spielberg's Hook--the child in a famous story has grown up, turned into a workaholic with strained marital/family relationships, and ultimately finds himself compelled to go back to his childhood world which--naturally--leads to him rediscovering the joys and imagination of his youth. It's been many many years since I watched Hook--the main thing I remember about it is that there was just so much going on. Both narratively and visually, the movie felt way overstuffed. Christopher Robin might have the opposite problem. The movie spends the first 50 minutes or so focusing on the bad marriage/bad father part. I think that is way too long to get to the good stuff--Christopher Robin going back to the hundred-acre wood--and when it does, it just doesn't have enough time to go in depth on what to me should be the heart of the story, which is Christopher Robin's realization of who he's become and his journey back to finding a connection to the boy he was. That sequence, despite being too brief, is pretty good. But it also shows that, despite the advertising, and despite the hijinks of the last third, this is not really a movie that's well-suited for young kids. It has some moving moments--"Have you left me behind, Christopher Robin?"--but it could've been more. Also, I always understood that "Christopher Robin" was a first name and middle name, but apparently Robin is the surname, at least according to this.

Also agree with Sabin about Eighth Grade--great movie, and Bo Burnham shows a natural filmmaking ability that most filmmakers don't approach this early in their career. The lead is extremely well-directed, but the fact that he doesn't turn it into a Welcome to the Dollhouse-esque misery-fest (which he could've easily done) was a huge relief to me. Just an excellent movie--one that'll definitely be high on my best of 2018 list.

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby anonymous1980 » Sun Aug 12, 2018 3:33 am

THE WIFE
Cast: Glenn Close, Jonathan Pryce, Christian Slater, Max Irons, Harry Lloyd, Annie Starke, Elizabeth McGovern.
Dir: Bjorn Runge.

A famous writer wins the Nobel Prize for Literature and him and his wife journey to Sweden to get the prize then the truth about the nature of their relationship and his work start to surface. This is actually a film that's kind of relevant to what's been going on lately, not in the sexual harassment realm but rather the equal opportunities for women kind of realm. It makes you really think about how many great women writers out there were not given a chance. This, as a film, is a pretty solid drama. The third act in particular is simply fireworks where Glenn Close reminds all of us what a great actress she is and has always been.

Oscar Prospects: Yeah, Close has a shot at winning. If Jonathan Pryce goes Supporting (though he's technically a co-lead here), he would also have a shot at a nomination as well.

Grade: B+

To Precious Doll: I had a similar situation with this. In our city, senior citizens get to watch movies for free. This is a small art house release and in my experience, lots of senior citizens buy tickets to this as time killers because it's nice, quiet, there's not a lot of people, etc. Basically they just want to sit. There was an old lady who was talking in her phone quite loudly behind me, my "shushing", as well as the shushing of other people around her, wasn't helping, she just continues blabbing on ("Well, I'm at this movie. It's raining outside", etc.) I couldn't take it so I got up and moved to another seat.

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby Precious Doll » Fri Aug 10, 2018 1:42 am

This is off topic and I didn't want to start a new thread and thought this would be a sort of appropriate one because I was sitting through a film when it happened.

I was utterly gobsmacked at something that happened to my partner today. We are currently attending the Melbourne Film Festival which normally consists of the most civilised and well behaved of audiences (i.e. no talking or fiddling with mobile telephones during the films). But this year has been exception. Every fucking second session something happens that should not be.

We were sitting behind (though not directly but a few seats away) two people, one of whom only a couple of minutes into the film pulled out their mobile phone and was fiddling away with it. My partner, in a loud very unimpressed disapproving voice told the person 'Could you put that phone away'. Needles to say the person complied. After, the film had ended the person's companion than had a go at my partner who replied that if the person had difficulty with modern technology that perhaps they shouldn't be using it. He was then accused of 'male aggression'. The two people in question were women, probably in their late sixties. I proceeded to complain to staff about this, though did say to them that there was little they could do.

Before every film shown at the Melbourne Film Festival are a series of adds. They change them around and show different ads but the very last ad is always the same one and is it about not using your mobile phone whilst driving and ends with the authoritarian figure in the ad talking directly to the audience to 'turn off your phones'. I've looked for a link to the ad on-line but haven't been able to find it.

The point of this little story is that now if you voice your displeasure of something that someone is doing, even if you are in the right, some political statement will be thrown back at you even though it has nothing to do with the situation at hand. My partner made his comment without any mention of sex, race, age, etc. Sure, his tone was one of annoyance but WTF don't people get that you don't use the damn things during a film for a whole variety of reasons. We were far from impressed but there is nothing we could do. Complaining to the festival is fruitless because I think they are doing what they can (the very clever ad they screen before each film) and I really don't have a solution to offer them myself so it's just a matter of pulling people up ourselves (others do it too as a number of times I have heard other people yell from the other side of the cinema 'Put that phone away' or 'Stop talking', etc).

It's also rather disturbing because we had another 'indecent' last night at a session that was even worse but I really don't want to go into all the details only to say that I feel I was lucky that I wasn't physically assaulted for asking someone to stop talking about 25 minutes into a film - I'm going to post those details on the Criterion forum under 'Movie experiences' when I get a chance. And to top it off I witnessed one of the most disgraceful displays of 'passenger' rage at pedestrians a couple of days ago that I have ever witnessed. The passenger in the car was screaming abuse at pedestrians legally crossing at the lights was a young woman angry because the driver of the car she was in couldn't make an immediate right hand turn - should have pulled out my phone an filmed it - could have been a YouTube sensation.

I jokingly said to my partner that perhaps we were in the wrong. After all, the film that this occurred during was Los silencois directed by Beatriz Seignor (a woman) and us being older white males, according to some prominent women in the film industry, couldn't possibly appreciate the film. Thankfully, neither of us a film critics so we won't be coming under the wraith of the likes of Blanchett, Bullock, Larson, etc, but I wonder if they have a problem with us spending our hard earned money on films directed by women. Is that still allowed?

Sorry for the cynicism but I'm still very pissed off at the unfounded comments made purely because they had no defence for their actions and resorted to man-hating.
"I have no interest in all of that. I find that all tabloid stupidity" Woody Allen, The Guardian, 2014, in response to his adopted daughter's allegations.

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby ITALIANO » Wed Aug 08, 2018 3:26 am

Big Magilla wrote:Question: Is A Quiet Place a good movie?
Answer: Has Michael Bay ever made a good movie?

No, Hollywood's crappiest successful filmmaker didn't direct it, but he produced it. John Krasinksi directed it from a script by a couple of guys from the MTV school of writing.

Krasinski's direction of wife Emily Blunt and some very talented kids as well as himself is strong, but the sript is not only illogical, it is absurd from the get-go.



True.

And you haven't seen that mess called Hereditary yet... :)

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby Sabin » Mon Aug 06, 2018 1:03 pm

I don't have time to write much about Bo Burnham's Eighth Grade but it's a remarkable film that is correctly being written about at some length for being the first film depicting a new generation: the pre-millennials, who had access to social media as children. Comparisons to Lady Bird are inevitable, although there is something very arbitrary about Gerwig's post-Iraq War setting (which could easily be 1994) while Eighth Grade couldn't be more specific about its time and place. Its a film about a socially awkward middle schooler with terrible skin who doesn't fit in. One would think that with access to social media, alienation in this generation would be the easiest thing in the world. Not the case. While vlogs are a bit old school, Kayla spends all of her time posting educational videos (about things she knows nothing about) seen by nobody that are clearly designed to prop herself up. In addition to Bo Burnham's stunning direction, the biggest strength of Eighth Grade is how perceptive it is about Kayla. It functions like a horror film of preteen anxiety, which is what makes it both a generationally specific film while having universal appeal.

Owen Gleiberman writes: ""Eighth Grade” is one of the rare time-capsule youth films, because it depicts the world as it is — but also shows you, just maybe, that there’s a way to exist in the hothouse of digital communion and find a place in it." -- I agree with this sentiment. Bo Burnham stages social media as an integral part of these kid's development. This isn't a film that pretends to be above judging social media. Every scene presents a clear argument about what's good or bad about it.

Credit to A24 for another wildly perceptive film about youth.
"If you are marching with white nationalists, you are by definition not a very nice person. If Malala Yousafzai had taken part in that rally, you'd have to say 'Okay, I guess Malala sucks now.'" ~ John Oliver

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby anonymous1980 » Sun Aug 05, 2018 4:36 am

CHRISTOPHER ROBIN
Cast: Ewan MacGregor, Hayley Atwell, Bronte Carmichael, Mark Gatiss, voices of Jim Cummings, Brad Garrett, Toby Jones, Nick Mohammed, Peter Capaldi, Sophie Okenedo.
Dir: Marc Forster.

This film was kind of inevitable. The Winnie the Pooh franchise has been predictably heading into this direction. This is about a now-married-with-a-child and overworked adult Christopher Robin going back to his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood to, you know, learn about what matters most in life. While it's not a bad film, it's such a predictable, by-the-numbers story where most anyone could definitely see where this is going. That said, Ewan MacGregor is good and the original A.A. Milne characters still has what makes them charming and endearing in the first place. No, it's not Disney's answer to Paddington but it easily could have been (and it also easily could have been a lot worse).

Oscar Prospects: Visual Effects is definitely a possibility.

Grade: B.

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby anonymous1980 » Sat Aug 04, 2018 8:52 am

TEEN TITANS GO! TO THE MOVIES
Cast: Greg Cipes, Scott Menville, Khary Payton, Tara Strong, Hynden Walch, Will Arnett, Kristen Bell, Nicolas Cage (voices).
Dirs: Peter Rida Michail & Aaron Horvath.

Thanks to my day job, I've actually seen a whole bunch of Teen Titans Go! episodes which I actually enjoyed. The good reviews that this one got enticed me to actually see it. In this 90-minute bigger-budgeted episode of the TV series, Robin is frustrated that he doesn't have his own movie and is on a quest to finally get out with the help of his fellow Teen Titans: Beast Boy, Cyborg, Starfire and Raven. This film is actually quite funny, filled with clever gags that will delight both kids and their parents. It is the perfect way to introduce meta humor to kids (basically this is Deadpool for kids). It surprisingly does not wear out its welcome and it's not too clever for its own good. I don't know how well it would play for non-superhero movie fans but it does make fun of the superhero genre a lot.

Oscar Prospects: Oscar doesn't seem to like movie adaptations of TV shows so much so I don't know if this has a shot but I do know that it deserves a Best Original Song nomination for "Upbeat Inspirational Song About Life".

Grade: B+

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby Reza » Sat Jul 28, 2018 11:07 am

Mission: Impossible - Fallout (Christopher McQuarrie, 2018) 6/10

The formula is now familiar - a mission goes wrong and Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his IMF team (Ving Rhames, Simon Pegg, Alec Baldwin) along with allies who help (yipee Rebecca Ferguson returns as the MI-6 agent) and hinder (Henry Cavill thrust upon the team by hardass CIA director Angela Bassett) try to right the wrong. It's a race against time to retrieve three plutonium orbs from the dastardly villain (Sean Harris) who threatens destruction of a catastrophic nature. The convoluted plot is, as always, just an excuse to create more and more outrageous stunts and action set pieces with the film's mega star at the front and center of it all. Cruise delivers a charismatic star performance although some of the set pieces are rather old hat - jumping out of a plane, the obligatory chase sequence through narrow Paris streets involving bikes and cars - although a three-way bone crunching fist fight in a loo is a major highlight along with the riveting climax which is intercut between a helicopter chase sequence which ends on a precipice with the star dangling on a rope and the diffusion of two bombs. Unfortunately the film goes on too long - a number of the talky sequences could have been cut as they stop the action dead in it's track. The screenplay also puts Cruise in a love triangle amidst all the mayhem - with the MI-6 agent and his ex-wife (Michelle Monaghan), who pops up via a dream sequence and later in reality during a crucial moment in the plot. And let's not forget the "White Widow" (Vanessa Kirby) - a sexy and dangerous arms broker - who lip-locks with Hunt creating further sparks. Hey....Cruise produced the film too so he can have three leading ladies fawning over him if he wants. This is perfect summer popcorn entertainment but in need of a desperate trim in its running time.

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby anonymous1980 » Sat Jul 28, 2018 8:15 am

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE - FALLOUT
Cast: Tom Cruise, Henry Cavill, Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames, Rebecca Ferguson, Alec Baldwin, Sean Harris, Angela Bassett, Vanessa Kirby, Michelle Monaghan, Wes Bentley, Frederick Schmidt.
Dir: Christopher McQuarrie.

The film did, well, the impossible. It's the sixth film in a 21-year-old franchise that was just okayish to begin with but it somehow manages to surprise and excite even a rather jaded cinephile like yours truly. The plot is fairly generic: Ethan Hunt and his IMF team must stop a global terrorist organization from wiping out a third of the planet's population via nuclear weapons. But it does its job enough that you care and are invested in the proceedings which would pave the way for exciting, extremely well-crafted action sequences one after another, culminating in this super incredible helicopter chase that is one of the best action scenes I've ever seen, quite frankly. Sprinkled with just enough humor for good measure, this is escapist popcorn entertainment at its best. Not quite as good as Ghost Protocol but close.

Oscar Prospects: This franchise has gotten zero Oscar attention so far but the acclaim for this particular installment could propel it to Visual Effect, Sound Mixing, Sound Editing and Film Editing.

Grade: A-

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby Big Magilla » Sun Jul 22, 2018 5:11 pm

It's almost August, and there are only two films that have been released so far this year that are strong contenders for my year-end ten best list. One is Lean on Pete. The other is Isle of Dogs.
“‎Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.” - Voltaire

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby dws1982 » Sun Jul 22, 2018 12:08 pm

Lean on Pete
Just excellent. I kind of had this grouped with The Rider mentally, because the trailers didn't offer a whole lot beyond "young man and a horse". The movies have similarities beyond the horse thing: Both deal with life on the margins of American society, with the way that people trapped in cyclical poverty seek to find meaning and purpose in their lives. This is simply one of the best portraits of a life of poverty that I've ever seen in a movie. As a teacher in a rural school district, where most students are low-income, I recognized this world, I knew these people--Charley and his father were similar to so many parents and students that I've dealt with before. There's also just a sense of kindness and decency to so many of the characters--Haigh brings a truly generous worldview to this film. The cast is excellent top-to-bottom--especially Charlie Plummer in the lead role. Beautifully shot, very moving, I would not be unhappy if this ended up as my number one movie of 2018. It's available to watch for free on Amazon Prime, make sure you do.

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Re: The Official Review Thread of 2018

Postby Mister Tee » Fri Jul 20, 2018 7:47 pm

As far as Leave No Trace:

What I can say for Debra Granik is, for someone whose films' subject matter is not really in my wheelhouse (I'm more disposed to urban settings/verbal characters, neither of which she much deals in), she manages to keep me engaged pretty much throughout. I don't think Leave No Trace is as strong as Winter's Bone: the latter had that mystery plot to give it a more solid narrative spine; this film, after a while, heads toward a destination that's fairly infer-able, and doesn't arrive there in a particularly unique or surprising way. But, with all that, it's a moving piece about marginal figures, and its detail work feels pretty strong.

As with Winter's Bone, Granik shows a knack for finding authentic rural faces (including Dale Dickey, again) who help the story breathe honestly. But most of the action centers around the two central characters. Ben Foster is adroitly cast: he carries so much crazypants baggage from earlier roles that he doesn't need to do much acting (and, happily, doesn't) to convey his character's inner turmoil; I much prefer his work here to some of his more extroverted work. But Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie is the breakout of the film -- a fully unaffected adolescent who carries the story without sentimentality. I'd guess her performance is one of those that some will start advocating for a best actress nomination, which for me is a bit of a stretch: her work is solid but plain -- something I can admire without getting too excited about it.

Which pretty much describes the film, as well. Certainly a welcome offering in this dreary part of the year, but at three star level, for me.


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